Is Harry Reid Finished in the Senate, Will He Retire … Reid is the ‘Most Vulnerable’ in 2016


Could it finally be the end of the road for Sen. Harry Reid? The Democrat Senate Minority Leader is considered the most vulnerable in 2016. According to the “Crystal Ball,” Reid is one of the most vulnerable Democrat Senators up for reelection in the 2016 cycle. Reid will be 77 years old in 2016 and most likely still in a position to not be in the majority. However, every time that it is predicted that its over for Harry Reid and he is trailing in the polls prior to election day, miraculously, he pulls a rabbit out of a hat.

Harry Reid_eye

This this VIDEO, boy does he sound tired and old

Senate minority leader Harry Reid is the most vulnerable Democrat up for re-election in 2016, and may retire to duck a humiliating defeat, according to a new analysis of the 2016 race.

“We identified Reid as probably the most vulnerable Democratic incumbent in this Senate cycle,” said a “Crystal Ball” report from the University of Virginia’s Center for Politics.

It’s also possible that he will retire, although his heavy fundraising and public comments suggest that he’s running again,” said the latest report from analyst Geoffrey Skelley. Recent reports suggest Reid is going for his sixth term.

The analysis found that of all senators ever to seek a sixth term, Reid’s ratings and margin of victory in past races puts him on the endangered list.

The Crystal Ball – Harry Reid & The Senate Survivors:

In the Crystal Ball’s first batch of 2016 Senate ratings in December 2014, we identified Reid as probably the most vulnerable Democratic incumbent in this Senate cycle. While we rate the contest as Leans Democratic, the prospect of a possible challenge from popular Gov. Brian Sandoval (R-NV) could seriously endanger Reid’s future in Congress’ upper chamber, and Reid’s weak approval ratings also make him potentially vulnerable to other, less heralded Republicans. It’s also possible that he will retire, although his heavy fundraising and public comments suggest that he’s running again. That said, Reid just suffered significant injuries in an exercising accident, and his wife and daughter have also had recent illnesses.

Ask and You Shall Receive … Sen. Mary Landrieu (D-LA) Said Back in 2013, “Unelect” Me If You Don’t Like ObamaCare


Back on 2013, Sen. Mary Landrieu said the following about Obamacare and how to deal with it if you don’t like it, “We did not wake up one morning and declare this the law.”  Um, actually you did. Landrieu went on the say, “the people of the United States declared this through us as their representatives. Then came the money line that Mary Landrieu may want to take back, ”And if they don’t like this they can unelected us. Believe me they will have the chance because I am up for reelection right now.”  OK, YOU’RE GONE!!!

The good people of Louisiana took her advice and threw her out of office in a big way. Mary Landrieu lost by 12% to Republican Bill Cassidy in yesterday’s special Senate runoff election.   As The Gateway Pundit reminds us, other states did the same thing as 29 of the 58 Democrat/2 Independents Senators who voted for Obamacare in 2009 are no longer in office. Following the 2014 midterm elections the GOP now controls the US Senate, 54-46 after gaining a net 9 seats.

UPDATE I: Don’t feel alone former Sen. Landrieu, exactly half of the 60 senators who voted for Obama’s health-care overhaul on Christmas Eve 2009 will not be in the Senate in January.

 Nineteen of them retired or resigned, eight were defeated for re-election, and three died in office. In her concession speech Saturday night, Landrieu said that she and others “fought a good fight, and it’s not over yet, for health care” and that she was “glad we fought for it.” She didn’t specifically mention Obamacare.

Louisiana Senate Runoff Election: Republican Bill Cassidy Defeated Democratic Mary Landrieu



The 2014 midterm elections have finally come to an end with today’s Louisiana Senate runoff election. Republican challenger Rep. Bill Cassidy has defeated incumbent Democrat Sen. Mary Landrieu to complete the 2014 midterm drubbing. The AP called the race for Cassidy after early returns showed him ahead of Landrieu by a wide margin.

Republican Rep. Bill Cassidy has defeated Democratic Sen. Mary Landrieu, denying her a fourth term and extending the GOP’s domination of the 2014 midterm elections that put Republicans in charge of Capitol Hill for the final two years of President Barack Obama’s tenure.

With Cassidy’s victory, Republicans will hold 54 seats when the Senate convenes in January, nine more than they have now. Republican victories in two Louisiana House districts Saturday – including the seat Cassidy now holds – ensure at least 246 seats, compared to 188 for Democrats, the largest GOP advantage since the Truman administration after World War II. An Arizona recount leaves one race still outstanding

Incumbent and 3 term Democratic Louisiana Sen. Mary Landrieu Defeated


Louisiana Secretary of State, Results for Election Date: 12/6/2014:

3423 of 4018 precincts reporting

Bill Cassidy (R):  58.84%   639877 votes
Mary L. Landrieu (D)  41.16%   447592 votes

UPDATE I: GOP Senate majority grows as Cassidy crushes Landrieu.

Rep. Bill Cassidy (R-La.) easily ousted incumbent Sen. Mary Landrieu (D-La.) in their Senate runoff on Saturday, capping off a dominating midterm election for Republicans.

The GOP’s victory in the final race of the 2014 cycle cements their nine-seat pickup in the upper chamber, giving them a 54 to 46 advantage over Democrats come January. Though Senate control wasn’t in the balance, Cassidy’s win is nonetheless an exclamation point on a midterm cycle that saw big gains for Republicans.

Polls in Louisiana closed at 9 p.m. EST, and the Associated Press called the race in favor of Cassidy at 9:30 pm with only 40 of the 4,018 precincts reporting and the Republican with a 64 percent to 36 percent lead.

UPDATE II: With all precincts reporting, he defeated Landrieu by just under 12 percentage points.

Louisiana US Senate Runoff Election Day: Rep. Bill Cassidy (R) and Sen. Mary Landrieu (D) … Incumbent Landrieu Headed for Historic Defeat

Louisiana Senate runoff election day:

Today, December 6, 2014, is the runoff US Senate election in Louisiana between challenger, Rep. Bill Cassidy and incumbent Sen. Mary Landrieu. As reported at  FiveThirtyEight, it appears that Sen. Landrieu is headed for an epic and historic defeat. The FiveThirtyEight model projects Landrieu losing by a 57.8% to 42.2%  margin. It may not be the greatest defeat for an incumbent senator; however, it would be in the top 10. Mary Landrieu’s last gasp for any shot of winning reelection went up in flames with her “Fail Mary” XL Keystone pipeline Senate vote. That was pretty much, game, set and match for the incumbent.  According to the RCP polling average,  Cassidy leads Landrieu by 20.2 points.

By days end, the Republican party will have a +9 senate pickup for 2014.

Senate_incumbent_top 10 defeats

The FiveThirtyEight model projects her losing the runoff 99.8 percent of the time, and by a 57.8 percent to 42.2 percent margin. That’s mostly based on polling, which can be unreliable in a low-turnout runoff.

What else do we know? The early voters in the Louisiana runoff have been vastly more Republican-leaning than early voters in last month’s election. And while whites were only 65 percent of early voters in November, they have been 70 percent for the runoff. Registered Republicans were only 34 percent of early voters in November, but they’ve been 39 percent of early voters for the runoff.

If this change in voter makeup holds on Saturday, it’s obviously very bad news for Landrieu. Assuming she wins the same percentage of white voters as Democratic candidates did in November, she’ll lose the runoff by roughly 60 percent to 40 percent, or about what the model forecasts.

A defeat that large would be the largest for an incumbent this year, topping Arkansas Sen. Mark Pryor’s 17-point loss. It would come close to Arkansas’s Blanche Lincoln’s 21-point loss in 2010, which ranks as the eighth-largest ever, as well as the largest loss for an incumbent since William Hathaway of Maine in 1978.

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