Steven Hill, Who Played DA Adam Schiff on ‘Law & Order’ Has Died at 94

MY FAVORITE DA OF ONE OF MY FAVORITE TV SHOW DIES …

Steven Hill, the original DA Adam Schiff on ‘Law & Order’ has passed away at the age of 94. Hill also had acting roles in the movies, “Billy Bathgate” (1991) and “The Firm” (1993). However, he will be best known for his role as NYC District Attorney Adam Schiff on Law & Order from 1990 to 2000.

Steven Hill, Rest in Peace, thank you Adam.

Steven Hill, who originated imposing lead roles on two notable television series, “Mission: Impossible” in the 1960s and “Law & Order” in the 1990s, died on Tuesday in Manhattan. He was 94.

His daughter Sarah Gobioff confirmed his death. He lived in Monsey, N.Y., a hamlet in Rockland County.

Mr. Hill was 44 and a veteran stage and television actor in 1966 when he was cast as Daniel Briggs, the leader of an elite covert-operations unit, in the new series “Mission: Impossible.” But he left after the first season, paving the way for Peter Graves’s six-season run as the show’s lead.

Even decades later, Mr. Hill declined to discuss his reasons for leaving the series, other than to say that the first season had been a bad experience. Other sources, including Patrick J. White, author of a book on the series, “The Complete Mission: Impossible Dossier,” said Mr. Hill was dismissed and learned the news only when he read a Daily Variety announcement that Mr. Graves was being hired.

According to Mr. White, Mr. Hill had developed a reputation for being difficult. His refusal to work late on Fridays, because of his observance of the Jewish sabbath, was also reported to be a problem. In Mr. White’s book, Mr. Hill’s co-star Martin Landau is quoted as saying, “I felt he was digging his own grave.”

Almost a quarter-century after that experience, Mr. Hill took on the role of the stern, seemingly imperturbable district attorney on a new cops-and-lawyers series based in New York, “Law & Order.” He played the role, said to be modeled on the long-serving Manhattan district attorney Robert M. Morgenthau, from 1990 to 2000.

Steven Hill was born Solomon Krakowsky on Feb. 24, 1922, in Seattle, the son of a furniture-store owner. He graduated from the University of Washington and at first moved to Chicago to work in radio.

He soon moved to New York and did frequent stage work in his early years there, making his Broadway debut in a small role in “A Flag Is Born” (1946), a pageantlike production written by Ben Hecht, with music by Kurt Weill, that starred Paul Muni and advocated the creation of the state of Israel.

Daily Commentary – Wednesday, August 17, 2016 – Cable News Ratings Still Show FoxNews on Top of Prime Time

  • While MSNBC has topped CNN for the second straight week and CNN falls to #16 of all cable news networks in the 8-11 prime time slot.

Daily Commentary – Wednesday, August 17, 2016 | Download

Daily Commentary – Wednesday, August 10, 2016 – One of the Most Popular Shows of the 60′s Was the Andy Griffith Show

  • Did you know that the fictional town of Mayberry was inspired by the town Andy Griffith grew up in?

Daily Commentary – Wednesday, August 10, 2016 | Download

Garry Marshall, Director of ‘Pretty Woman’ and Creator of ‘Happy Days’ and ‘Laverne & Shirley’ Dies at Age 81

GARRY MARSHALL, THE CREATOR OF SOME OF THE GREATEST SITCOMS EVER HAS PASSED AWAY

Garry Marshall, the man who created such amazing and iconic sitcoms like “Happy Days,” “The Odd Couple,” “Laverne and Shirley” and “Mork and Mindy” has passed away at the age of 81. Marshall, who  also directed the hit movie “Pretty Woman” died Tuesday in Burbank, California of complications from pneumonia following a stroke. What a loss. Marshall also created the lesser known ABC sitcom “Angie” and Happy Days spinoff “Joanie Loves Chachi.” Marshall also directed such movies like “Beaches,” “Overboard,” “The Flamingo Kid,” among the too numerous to mention. What an amazing talent.

Garry Marshall

Garry Marshall, who created some of the 1970s’ most iconic sitcoms including “Happy Days,” “The Odd Couple,” “Laverne and Shirley” and “Mork and Mindy” and went on to direct hit movies including “Pretty Woman” and “The Princess Diaries,” died Tuesday in Burbank, Calif. of complications from pneumonia following a stroke. He was 81.

Marshall went from being TV writer to creating sitcoms that touched the funny bones of the 1970s generation and directing films that were watched over and over: “Happy Days” helped start a nostalgia craze that has arguably never abated, while “Mork and Mindy” had a psychedelically goofy quality that catapulted Robin Williams to fame and made rainbow suspenders an icon of their era. “Pretty Woman” likewise cemented Julia Roberts’ stardom, while “The Princess Diaries” made Anne Hathaway a teen favorite

Tribute to Television Great Garry Marshall (and the making of Happy Days)

Marshall had one of his first substantial hits when he developed and exec produced an adaptation of Neil Simon’s play “The Odd Couple” in 1970 for ABC. The show drew several Emmy nominations for outstanding comedy series and wins for stars Jack Klugman and Tony Randall over the course of its five-season run. (In 2015 Marshall served as a consultant on a CBS remake of the series that starred Matthew Perry and Thomas Lennon.)

Marshall penned the 1971 pilot for “Happy Days,” which was recycled in 1972 as a segment of ABC’s comedy anthology series “Love, American Style” called “Love and the Happy Days.” George Lucas asked to view the pilot before deciding to cast Ron Howard, who starred in it, in “American Graffiti,” released in 1973. “Happy Days” debuted as a series on the network in 1974, riding high on the wave of 1950s nostalgia generated in part by the success of “American Graffiti.”

A star and one of the greatest sitcoms ever is born, how Happy Days became a reality.

Marshall penned the 1971 pilot for “Happy Days,” which was recycled in 1972 as a segment of ABC’s comedy anthology series “Love, American Style” called “Love and the Happy Days.” George Lucas asked to view the pilot before deciding to cast Ron Howard, who starred in it, in “American Graffiti,” released in 1973.

Daily Commentary – Thursday, April 28, 2016 – Not a Fan but There Seems to be Some Trouble Brewing on the Kelly & Michael Show

  • Michael Strahan’s sudden announcement that he was leaving Kelly and moving to Good Morning America full time, took Kelly Rippa by surprise. She took a couple days to “think” then returned last Tuesday

Daily Commentary – Thursday, April 28, 2016 Download

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