Debbie Reynolds Dies at Age 84 after Suffering a stroke One Day after her Daughter Carrie Fisher Passes Away

SADLY, THERE WILL BE A FUNERAL FOR TWO …

Hollywood legend and icon Debbie Reynolds has passes away at the age of 84 after suffering a stroke. She died just one day after her daughter, Carrie Fisher, died after suffering a massive heart attack and never regaining consciousness. According to reports prior to her stroke Reynold’s stated, “I want to be with Carrie”. The Hollywood icon died at Cedars- Sinai hospital.

Hollywood legend Debbie Reynolds died on Wednesday a day after the death of her daughter, telling family before a suspected stroke: ‘I want to be with Carrie’

The 84-year-old was rushed from her son Todd’s Beverly Hills home at around 1pm after falling ill while planning her daughter’s funeral.

She died in hospital hours later.

Todd Fisher revealed on Wednesday evening how his mother had been shattered with grief since his sister’s death the previous day.

On the morning of her death, she told him: ‘I miss her so much, I want to be with Carrie,’ according to TMZ.

Carrie Fisher, 60, died on Tuesday from complications which stemmed from a heart attack she suffered on Christmas Eve while flying to Los Angeles from London.

Debbie Reynolds, ‘Singin’ in the Rain’ Star and Carrie Fisher’s Mother, Dies at 84

The vivacious blonde, who had a close but sometimes tempestuous relationship with her daughter, was one of MGM’s principal stars of the 1950s and ’60s in such films as the 1952 classic “Singin’ in the Rain” and 1964’s “The Unsinkable Molly Brown,” for which she received an Oscar nomination as best actress.

Reynolds received the SAG lifetime achievement award in January 2015; in August of that year the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences voted to present the actress with the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award at the Nov. 14 Governors Awards, but she was unable to attend the ceremony due to an “unexpectedly long recovery from a recent surgery.”

Reynolds had a wholesome girl-next-door look which was coupled with a no-nonsense attitude in her roles. They ranged from sweet vehicles like “Tammy” to more serious fare such as “The Rat Race” and “How the West Was Won.” But amid all the success, her private life was at the center of one of the decade’s biggest scandals when then-husband, singer Eddie Fisher, left her for Elizabeth Taylor in 1958.

Posted December 29, 2016 by
Deceased, Hollywood, Obituary | one comment

Actress Carrie Fisher (Star Wars’ Princess Leia) Has Died at Age 60

A TRULY SAD DAY, THIS ONE HURTS A LOT

Carrie Fisher, the actress best known as Princess Leia of ‘Star Wars’ fame has passed away today at the age of 60. Carrie Fisher died this morning following a heart attack that caused her to be hospitalized on Friday on a flight from Los Angeles from London. Sadly, she could not recover from the massive heart attack and died at 8:55 this morning. She is survived by her mother, Debbie Reynolds; her daughter, Billie Lourd; and her beloved French bulldog, Gary. On a personal note, having grown up in the Star Wars era from Star Wars, A New Hope, in 1977 to the present day Rouge One, this one hurts a lot. This one strikes at my child hood, “a long time ago, in galaxy far, far away,” when things were just so much different. Carry Fisher, you will be so missed. Rest in peace and may the force be eternally with you.

Carrie Fisher

Family spokesman Simon Halls released a statement to PEOPLE on behalf of Fisher’s daughter, Billie Lourd:

“It is with a very deep sadness that Billie Lourd confirms that her beloved mother Carrie Fisher passed away at 8:55 this morning,” reads the statement.

“She was loved by the world and she will be missed profoundly,” says Lourd, 24. “Our entire family thanks you for your thoughts and prayers.”

Fisher was flying from London to Los Angeles on Friday, Dec. 23, when she went into cardiac arrest. Paramedics removed her from the flight and rushed her to a nearby hospital, where she was treated for a heart attack. She later died in the hospital.

The daughter of renowned entertainers Debbie Reynolds and Eddie Fisher, Fisher was brought up in the sometimes tumultuous world of film, theater and television.

New York Times obit:

Carrie Fisher, the actress, author and screenwriter who brought a rare combination of nerve, grit and hopefulness to her most indelible role, as Princess Leia in the “Star Wars” movie franchise, died on Tuesday morning. She was 60.

Ms. Fisher, the daughter of the pop singer Eddie Fisher and the actress Debbie Reynolds, went on to use her perch among Hollywood royalty to offer wry commentary in her books on the paradoxes and absurdities of the entertainment industry.

“Star Wars,” released in 1977, turned her overnight into an international movie star. The film, written and directed by George Lucas, traveled around the world, breaking box-office records. It proved to be the first installment of a blockbuster series whose vivid, even preposterous characters — living “a long time ago in a galaxy far, far away,” as the opening sequence announced — became pop culture legends and the progenitors of a merchandising bonanza.
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Ms. Fisher established Princess Leia as a damsel who could very much deal with her own distress, whether facing down the villainy of the dreaded Darth Vader or the romantic interests of the roguish smuggler Han Solo.

Wielding blaster pistols, piloting futuristic vehicles and, to her occasional chagrin, wearing strange hairdos and a revealing metal bikini, she reprised the role in three more films — “The Empire Strikes Back” in 1980, “Return of the Jedi” in 1983 and, 32 years later, “Star Wars: The Force Awakens,” by which time Leia had become a hard-bitten general.

Winning the admiration of countless fans, Ms. Fisher never played Leia as helpless. She had the toughness to escape the clutches of the monstrous gangster Jabba the Hutt and the tenderness to tell Han Solo, as he is about to be frozen in carbonite, “I love you.” (Solo, played by Harrison Ford, caddishly replies, “I know.”)

Posted December 27, 2016 by
Celebrity, Deceased, Obituary | one comment

Growing Pains Dad Alan Thicke Dead at Age 69 … RIP

SHOCK … GROWING PAINS DAD HAS PASSED AWAY

Alan Thicke, Canadian singer, songwriter and actor who is best remembered for his role as the dad, Dr. Jason Seaver, on the television 80′s sitcom “Growing Pains,” died Tuesday after an apparent heart attack. He was just 69.  According to TMZ, Thicke was playing hockey with his son around 11 AM when he started having chest pain, then got nauseous and vomited. The ambulance picked him up around 11:30 and took him to the hospital.  He  is survived by his 3 sons, Robin, Brennan and Carter and his wife, Tanya. What a shame, I grew up watching the Growing Pains. Rest in Peace, Alan Thicke.

alan-thicke

Alan Thicke, a Canadian singer, songwriter and actor best remembered for his portrayal of a father who was the ultimate suburban middlebrow dispenser of advice to his children on the television sitcom “Growing Pains,” died on Tuesday. He was 69.

His death was confirmed by the talent agent Nigel Mikoski, who represented Mr. Thicke. He died of a heart attack, Carleen Donovan, a publicist for one of his sons, the singer and songwriter Robin Thicke, said in an email.

Alan Thicke growing Pains

Mr. Thicke had a genial warmth that he projected across all of his television work, most memorably on “Growing Pains,” which ran from 1985 to 1992. He played a psychiatrist, Dr. Jason Seaver, a classic 1980s formulation of the reassuring father, and solved everyone’s problems with a warm homily by the end of each 30-minute episode.

Mr. Thicke displayed a diversity of talents that included songwriting. He wrote the theme songs for numerous game shows, including “The Joker’s Wild,” “Celebrity Sweepstakes” and the original “Wheel of Fortune,” and he most memorably co-wrote the themes for “Diff’rent Strokes” and “The Facts of Life” with Al Burton and Gloria Loring, his first wife and the mother of Robin Thicke.

Alan Thicke on parenting from NBC News.

Sadly, the deranged LEFT cannot even let people pass on and provide respect without bringing out their insanity. Some day these people will get a clue, then again. Maybe not.

Posted December 14, 2016 by
Celebrity, Deceased, Obituary | no comments

American Hero John Glenn dies at 95 … Godspeed, John Glenn

JOHN GLENN, A TRUE AMERICAN HERO HAS PASSED AWAY

Astronaut, aviator, US Senator and American icon and hero, John Glenn has passed away at the age of 95. Glenn died at the Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center in Columbus, Ohio, surrounded by family including his wife Annie. What a remarkable life. As a Marine Corps pilot, Glenn broke the transcontinental flight speed record before being the first American to orbit the Earth in 1962. Then, 36 years later at age 77 in 1998, becoming the oldest man in space as a member of the seven-astronaut crew of the shuttle Discovery. In a time in which we all dreamed of growing up to be astronauts, John Glenn made that a possibility. He is a national treasure and will be missed. Farewell to an American hero … Godspeed, John Glenn.

John Glenn

His legend is otherworldly and now, at age 95, so is John Glenn.

An authentic hero and genuine American icon, Glenn died this afternoon surrounded by family at the Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center in Columbus after a remarkably healthy life spent almost from the cradle with Annie, his beloved wife of 73 years, who survives.

He, along with fellow aviators Orville and Wilbur Wright and moon-walker Neil Armstrong, truly made Ohio first in flight.

“John Glenn is, and always will be, Ohio’s ultimate hometown hero, and his passing today is an occasion for all of us to grieve,” said Ohio Gov. John R. Kasich. “As we bow our heads and share our grief with his beloved wife, Annie, we must also turn to the skies, to salute his remarkable journeys and his long years of service to our state and nation.

The John Glenn Story

Sadly, with the passing of John Glenn, this means that all of the original 7 astronauts chosen to lead the fledgling US space program in 1959 are now dead. They were the last of a dying breed of space explorers who were larger than life. Maybe this will wake NASA up and they can get back to doing what NASA was intended to do.

  • John Glenn
  • Alan B. Shepard, Jr.
  • Virgil I. ‘Gus’ Grissom
  • Scott Carpenter
  • L. Gordon Cooper, Jr.
  • Walter M. Schirra, Jr.
  • Donald K. ‘Deke’ Slayton.

Gene Wilder, Star of ‘Willy Wonka’ & ‘Yound Frankenstein’ Dies at 83

WHAT A SAD, SAD DAY THAT WE HAVE LOST ONE OF OUR COMEDIC ICONS … YOUNG FRANKENSTEIN IS THE BEST COMEDY MOVIE EVER!!!

Gene Wilder has passed away at the age of 83  from complications from Alzheimer’s and we are a sadder world because of it. He was one of my all-time favorites. Wilder brought us so many laughs from Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory to Young Frankenstein to Blazing Saddles to Stir Crazy to one of his lesser known buy hysterical hits, The Adventure of Sherlock Holmes’ Smarter Brother. In the 1970′s and 1980′s there was no one any funnier. Put together director Mel Brooks, Gene Wilder, Richard Prior and Marty Feldman and you get comedic genius. Our loss is Heavens gain as Gene Wilder can now be reunited with for Gilda Radner

Gene Wilder, who regularly stole the show in such comedic gems as “The Producers,” “Blazing Saddles,” “Young Frankenstein,” “Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory” and “Stir Crazy,” died Monday at his home in Stamford, Conn. His nephew Jordan Walker-Pearlman said he died of complications from Alzheimer’s disease. He was 83.

His nephew said in a statement, “We understand for all the emotional and physical challenges this situation presented we have been among the lucky ones — this illness-pirate, unlike in so many cases, never stole his ability to recognize those that were closest to him, nor took command of his central-gentle-life affirming core personality. The decision to wait until this time to disclose his condition wasn’t vanity, but more so that the countless young children that would smile or call out to him “there’s Willy Wonka,” would not have to be then exposed to an adult referencing illness or trouble and causing delight to travel to worry, disappointment or confusion. He simply couldn’t bear the idea of one less smile in the world.

Quotes from Young Frankenstein that i still use to this day:

[Froederick and Igor are exhuming a dead criminal]
Dr. Frederick Frankenstein: What a filthy job.
Igor: Could be worse.
Dr. Frederick Frankenstein: How?
Igor: Could be raining.
[it starts to pour]

Dr. Frederick Frankenstein: [to Igor] Now that brain that you gave me. Was it Hans Delbruck’s?
Igor: [pause, then] No.
Dr. Frederick Frankenstein: Ah! Very good. Would you mind telling me whose brain I DID put in?
Igor: Then you won’t be angry?
Dr. Frederick Frankenstein: I will NOT be angry.
Igor: Abby someone.
Dr. Frederick Frankenstein: [pause, then] Abby someone. Abby who?
Igor: Abby… Normal.
Dr. Frederick Frankenstein: [pause, then] Abby Normal?
Igor: I’m almost sure that was the name.
Dr. Frederick Frankenstein: [chuckles, then] Are you saying that I put an abnormal brain into a seven and a half foot long, fifty-four inch wide GORILLA?
[grabs Igor and starts throttling him]
Dr. Frederick Frankenstein: Is that what you’re telling me?

Gene Wilder

Gene Wilder & Gilda Radner – Reunited again

New York Times Obit: Gene Wilder Dies at 83; Star of ‘Willy Wonka’ and ‘Young Frankenstein’.

 Mr. Wilder’s rule for comedy was simple: Don’t try to make it funny; try to make it real. “I’m an actor, not a clown,” he said more than once.

With his haunted blue eyes and an empathy born of his own history of psychic distress, he aspired to touch audiences much as Charlie Chaplin had. The Chaplin film “City Lights,” he said, had “made the biggest impression on me as an actor; it was funny, then sad, then both at the same time.”

Mr. Wilder was an accomplished stage actor as well as a screenwriter, a novelist and the director of four movies in which he starred. (He directed, he once said, “in order to protect what I wrote, which I wrote in order to act.”) But he was best known for playing roles on the big screen that might have been ripped from the pages of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders.

He was nominated for a Golden Globe for his performance as the wizardly title character in “Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory” (1971). The film was a box-office disappointment, partly because of parental concern that the moral of Roald Dahl’s story — that greedy, gluttonous children should not go unpunished — was too dark in the telling. But it went on to gain a devoted following, and Willy Wonka remains one of the roles with which Mr. Wilder is most closely identified.

In “Blazing Saddles,” a raunchy, no-holds-barred spoof of Hollywood westerns, Mr. Wilder had the relatively quiet role of the Waco Kid, a boozy ex-gunfighter who helps an improbable black sheriff (Cleavon Little) save a town from railroad barons and venal politicians. The film’s once-daring humor may have lost some of its edge over the years, but Mr. Wilder’s next Brooks film, “Young Frankenstein,” has never grown old.

Mr. Wilder himself hatched the idea, envisioning a black-and-white film faithful to the look of the Boris Karloff “Frankenstein,” down to the laboratory equipment, but played for laughs rather than for horror. He would portray an American man of science, the grandson of the infamous Dr. Frankenstein, who tries to turn his back on his heritage (“that’s Frahn-kahn-STEEN”) but finds himself irresistibly drawn to Transylvania to duplicate his grandfather’s creation of a monster in a spooky mountaintop laboratory.

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